Griffins Floral Designs

Griffins Floral Designs

Posted by Russ Griffin on September 15, 2016 | Last Updated: September 23, 2016 Flowers

Flowers and Rosh Hashanah Traditions

Rosh Hashanah traditions

Rosh Hashanah is one of the High Holy Days on the Jewish calendar. It is a holiday set aside to ask for forgiveness, and look forward to doing better in the year ahead, and as such it is marked both by serious personal reflection and festivities with family and friends. Jewish faithful spend the day in penitent prayer and attend traditional meals in the evening. All the customs of Rosh Hashanah speak to their great hope of the new year ahead. If you are looking for a way to say L’ Shanah Tovah – a Good New Year – to those people closest to you, a gorgeous arrangement from Griffins Floral Designs may be a perfect choice.

Rosh Hashanah traditions

Rosh Hashanah is comprised of two days and begins with a day of prayer at synagogue. A shofar (trumpet fashioned from a ram’s horn) is blown to call the faithful to repentance, and a special set of prayers are offered. Recognizing the spiritual meaning of the holiday, sending flowers in white and blue is customary. White flowers represent new beginnings and a clean slate; blue flowers are reminiscent of the divine.

Another element of Rosh Hashanah which is considered to highly significant is gathering for a festive holiday meal.  Our beautiful designs of white roses and blue hydrangea are a stunning way to decorate your table.

osh Hashanah traditionsAlthough customs vary by region and family, the traditional meal most often includes these items:

  • Apples are eaten after dipping in honey, representing the anticipation of a “sweet new year”.
  • Challah bread reminds the people of the manna given to the Israelites in the desert, and two loaves are traditionally baked and blessed.
  • A fish head is sometimes served to represent both the Hebrew translation of Rosh Hashanah – the “head of the year”  – as well as to reinforce that God’s people are to be leaders, not followers.
  • Pomegranates, which are heavy with seeds, are often eaten as “new fruit”, representing the hope for many opportunities in the new year.

New Albany, Pataskala, Newark, Columbus – the experts at Griffin’s Floral Designs wish L’Shanah Tovah to all of our Jewish friends and neighbors!